Prince’s Purple Probate Puzzle

Purple roseAs the local community recovers from the death its beloved local musical icon, it has come to light that Prince apparently died intestate (failed to leave a will).  Given that his large estate likely includes earnings, royalties, and real estate (plus any unpaid debts), settling it will probably be even more complicated given his extended family.  He apparently had several half-sibs in addition to his sister, and Minnesota succession law makes no distinction between half and whole siblings.  Then dig if you will the (potential) picture of some unknown person stepping forth claiming to be another sibling, or even a child, of Prince.  Given all of these factors, it is understandable that his sister sought appointment of a special administrator in Carver County Probate Court to handle his estate.

Assuming that there is indeed no will, Prince is neither the first nor the last person to die intestate. People might consider wills unnecessary if they have no spouse or dependents, or don’t consider their assets to be worth much.  They might also see themselves too young to be concerned with such worries.  The reality is that roughly two-thirds of people currently have no will.

There is no shortage of online tools to help answer questions about probate.  Start with the Probate and Planning brochure from the Minnesota Attorney General.  The Courts website also offers helpful forms and information on probate court.  Unfortunately, none of these resources offer help for actually making a will.  We offer some resources for those who are ready to make make theirs.  Read this basic fact sheet from Legal Aid for general information regarding wills.  Other useful information tools include The Wills & Trusts Kit (2nd ed. 2006), or Nolo’s Simple Will Book (7th ed. 2007).  From there it’s easy to find various online will forms, but since state probate laws vary, a better alternative might be How to Make a Minnesota Will (2nd ed. 2002).  Besides information, this book offers numerous sample fill-in-the blank forms.  Whatever you choose, it’s best to discuss your personal situation with an attorney so you can prepare a will that accurately states your wishes and sees them carried out under applicable state laws.  The Volunteers of America Estate and Elder Law Services can also assist eligible people with wills and estate planning.

 

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